Wednesday, May 05, 2010

An extra hour

I have an extra hour this morning. Nice. I also have a Church History assignment - not sure what level course it is, but it has a 2 in the number, so maybe 2nd year diploma/BTh. Do I just repeat back what the lecturer told us, even if I don't really agree? Or do I spend ages substantiating something that he might not like? When the answers required are 400 words, I should do the first.
I could also work on my doctor's proposal.
Would you like to guess which I'll do?

8 comments:

Anonymous said...

I spend too much time substantiating positions I think will conflict with the lecturer’s point of view to only get back one line reviews. Drives me nuts.

David Barbour said...

My guess? Go out and watch a movie instead.
Sorry I missed half your worship on Wed.

Jenny Hillebrand said...

Hi Mark - yes, you think people might actually be interested in your thoughts until you realise they are marking 100 versions of the same assignment! At least in my case the interaction is a bit more personal.
Hi David - that would have been a good option! I ended up with two hours and did both projects. You didn't miss much on Wednesday. I enjoyed your talk, thanks!

Steve Hayes said...

When I marked assignments I gave 50% to those who just regurgitated what I said (20% if it was plagiarised from the Study Guide, and 0% if it was plagiarised without acknowledgement). Differing views I marked depending on how well they were substantiated, if well substantiated they got over 80%.

The key here is whether they actually engage with what the lecturer/study guide/tutorial letter said. And to engage with it they have to understand it. Regurgitation does not give any clue to whether it has been understood or not.

Plagiarising shows no understanding. Paraphrasing shows understanding of the words used, but not necessarily of the concepts. Arguing with the concepts shows that the concepts have been grasped. Some students, however, simply write contrary views without engaging with the material (ie there is no attempt to substantiate their arguments). In a 400 word essay the point is not to produce perfect polished arguments, but to show that you have engaged with the material presented and grasped it, even if you disagree.

Jenny Hillebrand said...

Thanks Steve, I'm with you there. Now, does a denominational college have the right to expect you to toe the line in terms of agreement in academic questions?
SMMS it too new. We'll have to see where it goes.

Steve Hayes said...

I suppose it depends on which line you want to cross. If you say that John Wesley was a damnable heretic, then it might be said, with some justice, that you weren't really cut out to be a Methodist, and you might be better off in a college that took a different theological line.

Anonymous said...

I could list a few? ... ;).

Jenny, you're amongst my favourite Methodists of all time.

Jenny Hillebrand said...

Hi Steve - the Baptist College expected a faithfulness to Scripture - and I suppose some unwritten things, but I was free to disagree with Baptist doctrine itself - as long as it could be substantiated. The cynic in me says that the Methodist Church manages to persuade John Wesley to say whatever they want him to say at a particular moment. But I agree with your point.
Mark - thank you, I'll have to try to live up to that!